David A. Noyce

Professor


Profile Summary

Consider all the different ways transportation affects our daily life. Whether we take a car or transit to work, take a bus to school, consume goods shipped by truck, train, ship, or pipeline, travel internationally by plane, ride a bicycle, or simply walk, the efficiency and safety of our transportation system has a dramatic impact on how successful each mode will be. My research is focused on the operational and behavioral aspects of transportation safety. Recent activities have considered traffic control devices, left-turn signalization, centerline rumble strips, and applications of advanced technologies. Improving the operational and safety aspects of protected/permissive left-turns has been an interest area of mine for the past six years. We are currently working on improving permitted left-turn modelling. I am also very interested in crash data recording (black box) technology and vehicle crash analysis. I have worked with NHTSA and the Massachusetts Governor's Highway Safety Bureau and researched other transportation safety issues including speed management, occupant protection, and crash data.

I have spent the last four years working with full-scale driving simulation and studying driver comprehension and behavior related to various traffic control devices. We have used the simulator to study guide signs, traffic signal displays, rumble strips, young and old drivers, and the effects of low Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) on driver performance. We are currently looking at new technologies to improve the realism of the simulated environment.

A growing research area for me is bicyclists and pedestrians. I have developed a automated method of counting and classifying bicycles and pedestrians using active infrared technology. I am also working in the area of accessible pedestrian signal (APS) and developing methods for incorporating these technologies into the transportation environment.

Finally, I maintain an active traffic operations and geometric design program. We are redeveloping our transportation laboratory to include a fully signalized intersection to study advanced traffic signal operation methods. We also provide a means of testing new equipment and technologies as they enter the market. Our complete array of traffic data collection equipment allows us to move this lab into the field to incorporate real-time traffic.

The undergraduate and graduate students working with me form a research team directed at improving the safety and operations of all elements of transportation.

Education

  • Ph.D., Texas A&M University, 1999 M.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1995 B.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1984

Research Interests

  • Advanced Traffic Operations
  • Automated Detection and Classification of Pedestrians and Bicycles
  • Pedestrian Push Button Timing
  • Accessible Pedestrian Signals
  • Driver Behavior and Driving Simulation
  • Safety Impacts of Guardrail on Low Volume Roadways
  • Red Light Running
  • Centerline Rumble Strips
  • Protected/Permissive Left-turn Displays and Operations

Awards, Honors and Societies

  • Chair, Institute of Transportation Engineers,Pedestrian and Bicycle Council!
  • Young Engineer of the Year, Southwest Chapter, Wisconsin Society of Professional Engineers, 1993.
  • Student of the Year, Southwest University Transportation Center, University Transportation Centers Program, District VI, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1996.
  • Eno Foundation, Center for Transportation Leadership Fellow, 1997.
  • Engineering Education Scholars Program, National Science Foundation, 1998.
  • Robert Herman Award, Outstanding Graduate Student Award, Southwest University Transportation Center,District VI, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1998.
  • Distinguished Teaching Award Nominee, University of Massachusetts, 2001.
  • ExCEEd Teaching Fellowship, ASCE, 2002.
  • D. Grant Mickle Award, Transportation Research Board, Best Paper in Operations, Safety, and Maintenance, 2002.

Links

  • New course: CEE 679 -- Advanced Topics in Transportation Safety /cee/courses/cee679_advsafety.htm

Courses

Summer 2014

  • CIVENGR 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • CIVENGR 999 - Advanced Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CIVENGR 699 - Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 990 - Thesis
  • CIVENGR 573 - Geometric Design of Transport Facilities
  • CIVENGR 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CIVENGR 999 - Advanced Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 990 - Thesis
  • CIVENGR 699 - Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • CIVENGR 574 - Traffic Control
  • CIVENGR 370 - Transportation Engineering
  • CIVENGR 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CIVENGR 699 - Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 990 - Thesis
  • CIVENGR 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • Profile Summary

    Consider all the different ways transportation affects our daily life. Whether we take a car or transit to work, take a bus to school, consume goods shipped by truck, train, ship, or pipeline, travel internationally by plane, ride a bicycle, or simply walk, the efficiency and safety of our transportation system has a dramatic impact on how successful each mode will be. My research is focused on the operational and behavioral aspects of transportation safety. Recent activities have considered traffic control devices, left-turn signalization, centerline rumble strips, and applications of advanced technologies. Improving the operational and safety aspects of protected/permissive left-turns has been an interest area of mine for the past six years. We are currently working on improving permitted left-turn modelling. I am also very interested in crash data recording (black box) technology and vehicle crash analysis. I have worked with NHTSA and the Massachusetts Governor\'s Highway Safety Bureau and researched other transportation safety issues including speed management, occupant protection, and crash data.

    I have spent the last four years working with full-scale driving simulation and studying driver comprehension and behavior related to various traffic control devices. We have used the simulator to study guide signs, traffic signal displays, rumble strips, young and old drivers, and the effects of low Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) on driver performance. We are currently looking at new technologies to improve the realism of the simulated environment.

    A growing research area for me is bicyclists and pedestrians. I have developed a automated method of counting and classifying bicycles and pedestrians using active infrared technology. I am also working in the area of accessible pedestrian signal (APS) and developing methods for incorporating these technologies into the transportation environment.

    Finally, I maintain an active traffic operations and geometric design program. We are redeveloping our transportation laboratory to include a fully signalized intersection to study advanced traffic signal operation methods. We also provide a means of testing new equipment and technologies as they enter the market. Our complete array of traffic data collection equipment allows us to move this lab into the field to incorporate real-time traffic.

    The undergraduate and graduate students working with me form a research team directed at improving the safety and operations of all elements of transportation.


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