Gregg C. Vanderheiden

Professor

2112 Engineering Centers Building
1550 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706

Ph: (608) 263-5788
gv@trace.wisc.edu

Primary Affiliation:
Industrial and Systems Engineering

Additional Affiliations:
Biomedical Engineering,


Profile Summary

Gregg Vanderheiden is Director of the Trace R&D Center and a Professor in both the Industrial & Systems Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Departments at University of Wisconsin-Madison.Dr. Vanderheiden has been working on technology and disability for over 40 years. He was a pioneer in the field of Augmentative Communication (a term taken from his writings in the 1970's) before moving to computer access in the 1980s. Many of the accessibility features that are now built into every Macintosh, Windows and Linux computer were created by his group in the 1980s. He has worked with over 50 companies, served on numerous governmental advisory and study committees on both sides of the ocean, and has chaired and/or edited many of the early accessibility standards. He is co-founder of "Raising the Floor" (http://raisingthefloor.net) and initiated the international efforts to build the Global Public Inclusive Infrastructures (http://GPII.org). 

Education

  • BS 1972, electrical engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • MS 1974, biomedical engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • PhD 1984, technology in communication rehabilitation and child development, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Research Interests

  • ergonomics
  • mobile computing
  • computer interface design
  • rehabilitation engineering
  • computer access for people with disabilities
  • accessible design of mass market products
  • design of next-generation information and transaction systems
  • human augmentation
  • modality translation
  • cloud computing in e-inclusion
  • inclusive design

Awards, Honors and Societies

 

 

Awards: 

 

  • Isabelle and Leonard H. Goldenson Award for Outstanding Research in Medicine and Technology (1978).
  • National Easter Seal Society Certificate of Honor (1984).
  • National Council on Communicative Disorders Research Award (1984).
  • Wisconsin Speech, Language, and Hearing Association Clinical Achievement Award (1985).).
  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation Outstanding Clinical Achievement Award (1985).
  • Kishpaugh Award, Center for Computers and the Disabled, Dallas, Texas (1987).
  • RESNA Distinguished Service Award, Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America (1978, 1985, 1989).
  • Ragnar E. Onstad Service to Society Award, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison (1989).
  • Outstanding Faculty Award, McBurney Disability Resource Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, (1991).
  • Access Award, American Foundation for the Blind (1991).
  • U.S. Access Board, Outstanding Contribution Award (TAAC)(1996-1997).
  • Yuri Rubinski Memorial World Wide Web Award, presented at the 6th Annual International World-Wide-Web Conference (1997).
  • Ameritech and National Council of the Aging \"Innovator in Communications Technology\" Award (1997).
  • Strache Leadership Award, California State University-Northridge (1998).
  • RESNA Mentor Award, presented by the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (1998).
  • National Partnership for Reinventing Government Award,comprehensive requirements for accessible software design (1999).
  • Ron Mace Designing for the 21st Century Award (2000).
  • Compaq Accessibility Program Award(2001).
  • Who\'s Who in America (2004-present).
  • ACM Social Impact Award for the Human-Computer Interaction Community (2005)
  • Roland Wagner European Award for Computers Helping People with Special Needs, an award of the Austrian Computer Society presented to the Trace Center (2012).
  • Fellow Human Factors Society (2012).
  • Oberdorfer Award in Low Vision, presented by the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and the ARVO Foundation for Eye Research (2013).

 

 

Professional Societies and Activities:

 

  • President and Co-Founder, Raising the Floor-International (2011-Present).
  • Co-Chair, Industry-Government Committee on Access to Computers and Information Systems for Disabled Persons, 1983-1988.
  • Member, Study Committee on Disability in America (2005-06), National Academies Institute of Medicine, .
  • Member, National Task Force on Technology and Disability (2002-04).
  • Clinician, Communication Aids and Systems Clinic, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics (1979-1992).
  • American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) – Founding Fellow
  • Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) – Fellow; Founding Member and Newsletter Editor of Rehabilitation and Medical Technology SIG through qualification as a TG; service on HFES standards committees.
  • Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE).
  • Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) – Senior Member.
  • InterNational Committee for Information Technology Standards (INCITS)
  • International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC) – Founding Board of Directors (1983)
  • Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North American (RESNA) – Fellow, Past President (1993-94), Executive Committee and Board of Directors (1981-1996), Founding Member and Founding Publication Chair

 

Publications

  • Felton, E.A., Williams, J.C., Vanderheiden, G., & Radwin, R.G. (2012). Mental workload during brain-computer interface training. Ergonomics 55(5), 526-537.
  • Shane, H.C., Blackstone, S., Vanderheiden, G., Williams, M., & DeRuyter, F. (2012). Using AAC technology to access the world. Assistive Technology, 24(1), 3-13.Vanderheiden, G. C. & Jordan, J. B. (2012). Design for people with functional limitations. In G. Salvendy (Ed.), Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics (pp. 1409-1441). New York: Wiley.
  • Emiliani, P.L.,Stephanidis, C., & Vanderheiden, G. (2011). Technology and inclusion – Past, present and foreseeable future. Technology and Disability, 23(3), 101-114.
  • Irwin, C.B., Yen, T.Y., Meyer, R.H., Vanderheiden, G.C., Kelso, D.P., Sesto, M.E. (2011). Use of force plate instrumentation to assess kinetic variables during touch screen use. Universal Access in the Information Society 10(4), 453-460.
  • Caldwell, B. & Vanderheiden, G. (2011). Access to Web Content by Those with Disabilities and Others Operating under Constrained Conditions. In K. P. L. Vu and R. W. Proctor (Eds.), Handbook of Human Factors in Web Design (pp. 371-401) Boca Raton: FL: CRC Press.
  • Vanderheiden, G.C. (2009). Accessible and usable design of information and communication technologies. In C. Stephanidis (Ed.), The universal access handbook(pp. 31-56).
  • Vanderheiden, G C.(2008).Ubiquitous Accessibility, Common Technology Core, and Micro Assistive Technology. ACM Transactions in Accessible Computing 1(2),10.1-7
  • Zimmermann, G., & Vanderheiden, G. (2008). Accessible design and testing in the application development process: Considerations for an integrated approach. Universal Access in the Information Society, 7(1-2), 117-128.National Council on Disability. (2006). Over the horizon: Potential impact of emerging trends in information and communication technology on disability policy and practice. Washington, DC: Author.(Written by Gregg Vanderheiden for NCD.)
  • Vanderheiden, G.C. (2006). Potential impact of new technologies on telecommunication for elders. Generations: Journal of the American Society on Aging, XXX(2), 9-12.
  • Vanderheiden, G. C. (2006). Design for people with functional limitations. In G. Salvendy (Ed.), Handbook of human factors and ergonomics (pp. 1387-1417). New York: Wiley.
  • Arditi, A., Vanderheiden, G. C., & Gordon, A. R. (2005). Proposal for an accessible color contrast standard for text on the World Wide Web. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 46 (Suppl), 2331.
  • Vanderheiden, G.C. (2004). Using extended and enhanced usability (EEU) to provide access to mainstream electronic voting machines. Information Technology and Disabilities, 10(2).
  • Vanderheiden, G. (2002). Interaction for diverse users. In J. Jacko & A. Sears (Eds.) Human-computer interaction handbook (pp. 397-400).Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Vanderheiden, G. C. (2002). A journey through early augmentative communication and computer access. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 39(6 SUPPL),39-53.
  • Vanderheiden, G., & Iacono S. (2001).Information technology impacts, Proceedings from White House Technologies for Successful Aging Workshop, Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development 38 (1, Supplement) S52-S53. Baltimore, MD.
  • Vanderheiden, G. C. (1999). Impact of digital miniaturization and networked topologies on access to next generation telecommunication by people with visual disabilities. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 36(4), 365-370.

Links

Interests

Professor Vanderheiden\'s interests cover a wide range of research areas in technology, human disability, and aging. Current research includes development of new interface technologies, models for information transfer across sensory modalities, network-based services, techniques for augmenting human performance, enhancing the usability of the environment, and matching enhanced abilities to environmental demands. He also studies and develops standards for access to Web-based technologies, operating systems and telecommunicaiton systems.

He is Director of the Trace R&D Center. More complete information on Prof. Vanderheiden\'s work can be found at http://trace.wisc.edu, http://raisingthefloor.net and http://GPII.org

Courses

Summer 2014

  • ISYE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • ISYE 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • ISYE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ISYE 662 - Design and Human Disability and Aging
  • BME 990 - Research and Thesis
  • BME 890 - Pre-dissertation Research
  • BME 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • BME 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • BME 662 - Design and Human Disability and Aging
  • BME 990 - Research and Thesis
  • BME 890 - Pre-dissertation Research
  • BME 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • BME 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ISYE 990 - Research and Thesis
  • ISYE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • ISYE 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • ISYE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ISYE 990 - Research and Thesis
  • ISYE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • ISYE 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • ISYE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • BME 990 - Research and Thesis
  • BME 890 - Pre-dissertation Research
  • BME 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • BME 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • Profile Summary

    Gregg Vanderheiden is Director of the Trace R&D Center and a Professor in both the Industrial & Systems Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Departments at University of Wisconsin-Madison.Dr. Vanderheiden has been working on technology and disability for over 40 years. He was a pioneer in the field of Augmentative Communication (a term taken from his writings in the 1970\'s) before moving to computer access in the 1980s. Many of the accessibility features that are now built into every Macintosh, Windows and Linux computer were created by his group in the 1980s. He has worked with over 50 companies, served on numerous governmental advisory and study committees on both sides of the ocean, and has chaired and/or edited many of the early accessibility standards. He is co-founder of "Raising the Floor" (http://raisingthefloor.net) and initiated the international efforts to build the Global Public Inclusive Infrastructures (http://GPII.org). 


    Update Profile