Michael L. Corradini

Wisconsin Distinguished Professor


Profile Summary

Professor Corradini is a mechanical and nuclear engineer with research interests centered primarily in thermal hydraulics and multiphase flow. He especially emphasizes the areas of reactor operation, reactor safety, reprocessing, and recycle and risk assessment. He is chair of the Energy Institute Executive committee and the director of the college's Wisconsin Institute of Nuclear Systems

The goal of research in multiphase flow is to help students understand basic physical phenomena which they analytically model or experimentally measure. Current research programs focus on four areas:

First, light water safety research analytically and/or experimentally looks at physical processes for design basis accidents or those that go beyond the design base (degraded-core accidents). These processes include critical heat flux, improved heat transfer and clad materials, hydrogen generation, molten fuel (coolant interactions, debris-bed formation and heat transfer, and molten core), concrete interactions, and containment behavior and response. All of these physical processes are coupled together under the risk assessment methodology and deterministic analyses.

Second, light water reactor operations work aids Midwest utilities in simulator modeling, operator training and accident response, and nuclear systems analysis. Research results contribute to advanced water reactor designs.

Third, fusion reactor research identifies and analyzes generic thermal hydraulic phenomena to improve current design studies including liquid-metal heat transfer and liquid-metal/water-safety concerns.

Finally, graduate students are developing new technologies related to reprocessing and recycling. These technologies minimize waste streams and recover valued by-products.

Education

  • BS 1975, Mechanical Engineering, Marquette University
  • MS 1976, Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • PhD 1978, Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research Interests

  • multi-phase fluid mechanics and heat transfer
  • fission and fusion reactors
  • nuclear reactor safety
  • severe accident phenomena
  • power plant operation and design
  • energy policy
  • nuclear fuel cycle

Awards, Honors and Societies

  • Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (2006 - present)
  • Chair of French Atomic Energy Agency Scientific Review Committee (2010 - present)
  • American Nuclear Society President (2012-2013)
  • INPO Training and Education Accreditation Board (2004 - 2008)
  • Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, Chair (2002 - 2004)
  • DOE Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (2000 - present)
  • National Academy of Engineering (1998)
  • University of Wisconsin Distinguished Teaching Award (1996)
  • Fellow of the American Nuclear Society
  • ANS Young Members Achievement Award (1990)
  • Presidential Young Investigator (1984)

Links

Courses

Summer 2014

  • ME 990 - Dissertator Research and Thesis

  • ME 890 - PhD Research and Thesis
  • ME 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • ME 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • EMA 599 - Independent Study
  • NE 990 - Research and Thesis
  • NE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • NE 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • NE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • NE 571 - Economic and Environmental Aspects of Nuclear Energy
  • NE 412 - Nuclear Reactor Design
  • NE 489 - Honors in Research
  • NE 990 - Research and Thesis
  • NE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • NE 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • NE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • NE 411 - Nuclear Reactor Engineering
  • NE 489 - Honors in Research
  • EP 602 - Special Topics in Engineering Physics
  • EMA 599 - Independent Study
  • ME 990 - Dissertator Research and Thesis
  • ME 890 - PhD Research and Thesis
  • ME 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • ME 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ME 491 - Mechanical Engineering Projects I
  • UNIVFOR 500 - University Forum
  • NE 990 - Research and Thesis
  • NE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • NE 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • NE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • NE 412 - Nuclear Reactor Design
  • NE 489 - Honors in Research
  • ME 990 - Dissertator Research and Thesis
  • ME 890 - PhD Research and Thesis
  • ME 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • ME 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • EP 602 - Special Topics in Engineering Physics
  • EMA 599 - Independent Study
  • Profile Summary

    Professor Corradini is a mechanical and nuclear engineer with research interests centered primarily in thermal hydraulics and multiphase flow. He especially emphasizes the areas of reactor operation, reactor safety, reprocessing, and recycle and risk assessment. He is chair of the Energy Institute Executive committee and the director of the college\'s Wisconsin Institute of Nuclear Systems

    The goal of research in multiphase flow is to help students understand basic physical phenomena which they analytically model or experimentally measure. Current research programs focus on four areas:

    First, light water safety research analytically and/or experimentally looks at physical processes for design basis accidents or those that go beyond the design base (degraded-core accidents). These processes include critical heat flux, improved heat transfer and clad materials, hydrogen generation, molten fuel (coolant interactions, debris-bed formation and heat transfer, and molten core), concrete interactions, and containment behavior and response. All of these physical processes are coupled together under the risk assessment methodology and deterministic analyses.

    Second, light water reactor operations work aids Midwest utilities in simulator modeling, operator training and accident response, and nuclear systems analysis. Research results contribute to advanced water reactor designs.

    Third, fusion reactor research identifies and analyzes generic thermal hydraulic phenomena to improve current design studies including liquid-metal heat transfer and liquid-metal/water-safety concerns.

    Finally, graduate students are developing new technologies related to reprocessing and recycling. These technologies minimize waste streams and recover valued by-products.


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