Kenneth W. Potter

Professor

1261C Engineering Hall
1415 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706

Ph: (608) 262-0040
Fax: (608) 262-5199
kwpotter@facstaff.wisc.edu


Profile Summary

The restoration of degraded aquatic systems requires the re-establishment of natural flow rates and water levels. Our research includes assessment of hydrologic conditions, under past, present, and alternative future conditions. We are particularly interested in the exchange of water between surface and subsurface systems. The growth of urban areas is a primary threat to aquatic resources. "Low-impact development" offers a potential way to accommodate population growth without sacrificing environmental quality. One promising strategy is to construct impervious and pervious areas so as to maintain natural rates of infiltration and groundwater recharge. Our research involves both the design and evaluation of various strategies for low-impact land development. Aquatic resources, such as streams, lakes, wetlands, and groundwater, are essential to our well being. Ironically, use of these resources and their associated watersheds has led to their degradation. Our research focuses on providing a technical basis for the sustainable use of aquatic resources and for the restoration of degraded aquatic resources. This research is strongly interdisciplinary, involving faculty and students from the earth, life, and social sciences, as well as from engineering. Research methods include the use of field measurements and hydrologic modeling.

Education

  • BS, Louisiana State University
  • PhD, Johns Hopkins University

Research Interests

  • hydrological modeling and design
  • stormwater modeling, management and design
  • estimation of hydrologic risk
  • estimation of hydrological budgets
  • restoration of aquatic systems

Awards, Honors and Societies

  • Woodrow Wilson Fellow
  • Fellow, American Geophysical Union
  • Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science

Courses

Summer 2014

  • ENVIRST 718 - Water Resources Management Practicum Planning Seminar II

  • CIVENGR 990 - Thesis
  • CIVENGR 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • CIVENGR 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CIVENGR 699 - Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 414 - Hydrologic Design
  • CIVENGR 311 - Hydroscience
  • CIVENGR 718 - Water Resources Management Practicum Planning Seminar II
  • CIVENGR 999 - Advanced Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 489 - Honors in Research
  • GLE 999 - Independent Work
  • GLE 990 - Research and Thesis
  • GLE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • GLE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • GLE 699 - Independent Study
  • URBRPL 718 - Water Resources Management Practicum Planning Seminar II
  • URBRPL 717 - Water Resources Management Practicum Planning Seminar I
  • GLE 990 - Research and Thesis
  • GLE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • GLE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CIVENGR 717 - Water Resources Management Practicum Planning Seminar I
  • CIVENGR 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • CIVENGR 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CIVENGR 699 - Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 999 - Advanced Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 990 - Thesis
  • ENVIRST 717 - Water Resources Management Practicum Planning Seminar I
  • GLE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • GLE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CIVENGR 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • CIVENGR 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CIVENGR 699 - Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 719 - Water Resources Management Summer Practicum
  • CIVENGR 999 - Advanced Independent Study
  • CIVENGR 990 - Thesis
  • ENVIRST 719 - Water Resources Management Summer Practicum
  • URBRPL 719 - Water Resources Management Summer Practicum
  • Profile Summary

    The restoration of degraded aquatic systems requires the re-establishment of natural flow rates and water levels. Our research includes assessment of hydrologic conditions, under past, present, and alternative future conditions. We are particularly interested in the exchange of water between surface and subsurface systems. The growth of urban areas is a primary threat to aquatic resources. "Low-impact development" offers a potential way to accommodate population growth without sacrificing environmental quality. One promising strategy is to construct impervious and pervious areas so as to maintain natural rates of infiltration and groundwater recharge. Our research involves both the design and evaluation of various strategies for low-impact land development. Aquatic resources, such as streams, lakes, wetlands, and groundwater, are essential to our well being. Ironically, use of these resources and their associated watersheds has led to their degradation. Our research focuses on providing a technical basis for the sustainable use of aquatic resources and for the restoration of degraded aquatic resources. This research is strongly interdisciplinary, involving faculty and students from the earth, life, and social sciences, as well as from engineering. Research methods include the use of field measurements and hydrologic modeling.


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