John G Webster

Professor Emeritus

Room: 2148
Engineering Centers Building
1550 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706

Ph: (608) 263-1574
Fax: (608) 265-9239
webster@engr.wisc.edu


Profile Summary

My graduate students and I are involved in the following research.

Implantable intracranial pressure monitor:

We are working with Department of Neurological Surgery Professor Joshua Medow to develop a permanently implanted passive pressure sensor to measure intracranial pressure (ICP). At anytime, the hydrocephalic patient, care taker, or physician can hold an external display device over the internal sensor coil and display the ICP and waveform to determine if the ICP has increased due to shunt obstruction which can require surgical intervention. Pressure will (1) deform the membrane and (2) move interior inductor
coils closer together to (3) cause changes in resonant frequency. The external display device coil will link inductively to the internal sensor coil to measure the change in resonant frequency and convert it to pressure.

Miniature sternal skin-attached hot flash monitor:

Hot flashes cause loss of sleep and workplace disruptions in some menopausal women. In testing potential therapies, subjective diaries are unreliable. Present objective recorders of skin conductance changes are bulky. We have developed a miniature recorder to collect objective data. We are developing signal processing algorithms that best detect our objectively recorded hot flashes as compared with subjectively recorded hot flashes. See hot flash below.

Education

  • PhD 1967, University of Rochester

Research Interests

  • medical instrumentation
  • implantable intracranial pressure monitor
  • safety of less-lethal electromuscular incapacitation device (EMD): stun guns and Tasers
  • biopotential amplifiers and interference
  • bioelectrodes

Publications

Links

Courses

Summer 2014

  • BME 310 - Bioinstrumentation
  • BME 990 - Research and Thesis
  • BME 890 - Pre-dissertation Research
  • BME 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • BME 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ECE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ECE 990 - Research or Thesis
  • ECE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • ECE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • BME 462 - Medical Instrumentation
  • BME 399 - Independent Study
  • BME 990 - Research and Thesis
  • BME 890 - Pre-dissertation Research
  • BME 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • BME 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ECE 462 - Medical Instrumentation
  • ECE 990 - Research or Thesis
  • ECE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • ECE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • BME 999 - Advanced Independent Study
  • BME 990 - Research and Thesis
  • BME 890 - Pre-dissertation Research
  • BME 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • BME 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • Profile Summary

    My graduate students and I are involved in the following research.

    Implantable intracranial pressure monitor:

    We are working with Department of Neurological Surgery Professor Joshua Medow to develop a permanently implanted passive pressure sensor to measure intracranial pressure (ICP). At anytime, the hydrocephalic patient, care taker, or physician can hold an external display device over the internal sensor coil and display the ICP and waveform to determine if the ICP has increased due to shunt obstruction which can require surgical intervention. Pressure will (1) deform the membrane and (2) move interior inductor
    coils closer together to (3) cause changes in resonant frequency. The external display device coil will link inductively to the internal sensor coil to measure the change in resonant frequency and convert it to pressure.

    Miniature sternal skin-attached hot flash monitor:

    Hot flashes cause loss of sleep and workplace disruptions in some menopausal women. In testing potential therapies, subjective diaries are unreliable. Present objective recorders of skin conductance changes are bulky. We have developed a miniature recorder to collect objective data. We are developing signal processing algorithms that best detect our objectively recorded hot flashes as compared with subjectively recorded hot flashes. See hot flash below.


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