Chang-Beom Eom

Theodore H. Geballe Professor and Harvey D. Spangler Distinguished Professor

2164 Engineering Centers Building
1550 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706

Ph: (608) 263-6305
Fax: (608) 263-9017
eom@engr.wisc.edu

Primary Affiliation:
Materials Science and Engineering

Additional Affiliations:
Materials Science Program, Physics


Profile Summary

The research of our group has spanned many areas of heteroepitaxy of complex oxides and nanostructure fabrication, from thin film synthesis to characterization and device application of various novel materials.Many new electronic, magnetic and optical devices require sophisticated thin film structures or multilayers, which demand that the thickness be controlled down to one unit cell; other devices may need lateral dimensions to be patterned down to nanometer sizes. Complex oxide materials possess an enormous range of electrical, optical, and magnetic properties. For instance, insulators, high quality metals, dielectrics, ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics, semiconductors, ferromagnetics, transparent conductors, colossal magnetoresistance materials, superconductors, and nonlinear optic materials have all been produced using oxide materials. Therefore, thin films and heterostructures of oxide materials have great potential for novel device applications. A major challenge is to prepare these materials with epitaxial thin film form with atomic layer control and integrate them so that these properties can be fully utilized in electronic devices.Our interest includes the synthesis and characterization of epitaxial oxide heterostructures and heterointerfaces uniquely suited for oxide nanoelectronics piezoelectric heterostructures for hyper-active MEMS/NEMS, ferroelectric and multiferroics for magnetoelectric and photovoltaic devices.Our interest also includes the epitaxial growth of ferronictide superconducting thin films and 2-dimensional electron gas at oxide hetero-interfaces.

Education

  • BS 1981, Hanyang University
  • MS 1983, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
  • Ph.D 1991, Stanford University

Research Interests

  • Nanostructure fabrications of novel materials
  • Hetroepitaxy of complex oxide thin films and heterostructures

Awards, Honors and Societies

  • Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation Named Professorship (2013)
  • Associate Editor of APL Materials (2013- present)
  • The Board of Directors of Materials Research Society (2012)
  • Fellow of Materials Research Society (2011)
  • Ho-Am Prize in Engineering (2007)
  • Byron Bird Award for Excellence in a Research Publication, University of Wisconsin-Madison (2007)
  • Fellow of the American Phyiscal Society (2004)
  • Invited Professor of University of Geneva, Switzerland (2003)
  • David and Lucile Packard Fellowship (1995)
  • National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award (1994)
  • J. Robert Oppenheimer Fellowship (1993)
  • Eugene P. Wigner Fellowship (1993)

Publications

Books

  • Multifunctional Oxide Heterostructures, edited by E.Y Tsymbal, E.R.A. Dagotto, C.B. Eom and R. Ramesh, Oxford University Press (2012)
  • Handbook of Thin Film Devices: Volume 3. Superconducting Film Devices, edited by P.B. Broussard, Academic Press.

 Selected Publications

  • “Artificially engineered superlattices of pnictide superconductor”, S. Lee, C. Tarantini, P. Gao, J. Jiang, J. D. Weiss, F. Kametani, C. M. Folkman, Y. Zhang, X. Q. Pan, E. E. Hellstrom, D. C. Larbalestier, and C. B. Eom, Nature Materials, DOI: 10.1038/NMAT3575  (2013)
  • “Mechanical Writing of Ferroelectric Polarization”, H. Lu, C.W. Bark, D. Esque de los Ojos, J. Alcala, C.B. Eom, G. Catalan, and A. Gruverman,  SCIENCE, 336, 59 (2012)  

Links

Courses

Fall 2014-2015

  • MS&E 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • MS&E 699 - Independent Study
  • MS&E 990 - Research and Thesis
  • MS&E 448 - Crystallography and X-Ray Diffraction
  • Profile Summary

    The research of our group has spanned many areas of heteroepitaxy of complex oxides and nanostructure fabrication, from thin film synthesis to characterization and device application of various novel materials.Many new electronic, magnetic and optical devices require sophisticated thin film structures or multilayers, which demand that the thickness be controlled down to one unit cell; other devices may need lateral dimensions to be patterned down to nanometer sizes. Complex oxide materials possess an enormous range of electrical, optical, and magnetic properties. For instance, insulators, high quality metals, dielectrics, ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics, semiconductors, ferromagnetics, transparent conductors, colossal magnetoresistance materials, superconductors, and nonlinear optic materials have all been produced using oxide materials. Therefore, thin films and heterostructures of oxide materials have great potential for novel device applications. A major challenge is to prepare these materials with epitaxial thin film form with atomic layer control and integrate them so that these properties can be fully utilized in electronic devices.Our interest includes the synthesis and characterization of epitaxial oxide heterostructures and heterointerfaces uniquely suited for oxide nanoelectronics piezoelectric heterostructures for hyper-active MEMS/NEMS, ferroelectric and multiferroics for magnetoelectric and photovoltaic devices.Our interest also includes the epitaxial growth of ferronictide superconducting thin films and 2-dimensional electron gas at oxide hetero-interfaces.


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