James P. Blanchard

Duane H. and Dorothy M. Bluemke Professor and Chair


Profile Summary

Professor Blanchard's research interests include radiation damage in fission and fusion environments, high temperature component design, and nuclear microbatteries.

If fusion is to be a viable commercial industry, reactor designs must provide adequate component lifetimes. This requires an understanding of various radiation damage mechanisms and their effects on the properties of materials involved. Blanchard conducts theoretical research on the impact of radiation damage to the structural behavior of in-reactor components. He estimates component lifetimes and identifies critical areas where further experimental work is required.

Blanchard is also interested in the design of high temperature components. This requires analysis of a variety of effects, including thermal stresses, creep, fatigue, and fracture. Blanchard and his students have conducted numerous studies of these phenomena for conceptual fusion devices.

Blanchard is also interested in the design of nuclear microbatteries. He and his collaboratorrs are using the decay of radioisotopes to create power sources for MEMS devices. We use silicon beams to capture the particles produced by the decay and this results in an electric potential which can be tapped to provide electricity to a MEMS component. One interesting application is the development of a nuclear powered RF transmitter that will allow these devices to communicate with each other wirelessly. Blanchard has also carried out conceptual design of betacells, which are similar to solar cells, but are powered by beta decay. 

Education

  • BS 1982, Mechanical Engineering, University of California-Los Angeles
  • MS 1983, Engineering, University of California-Los Angeles
  • PhD 1988, Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Los Angeles

Research Interests

  • thermomechanical design for high heat fluxes
  • fusion technology
  • radiation damage
  • nuclear microbatteries

Awards, Honors and Societies

  • Harvey Spangler Award for Technology Enhanced Instruction, 2008
  • UW Distinguished Teaching Award, 2002
  • UW Teaching Academy (1995)
  • Presidential Young Investigator (1990)

Publications

Recent Publications (since 2006)

    1. TJ Renk, PP Provencio, TJ Tanaka, JP Blanchard, CJ Martin, and TR Knowles, “Survivability of First-Wall Materials in Fusion Devices: An Experimental Study of Material Exposure to Pulsed Energetic Ions,” Fus Sci Tech, 61, 2012, 57.
    2. JP Blanchard, CJ Martin, M Tillack, and X. Wang, “Ratcheting Models For Fusion Component Design,” Fus Sci Tech, 60, 2011, 313-317.                   
    3. JD Sethian, et al, “The Science and Technologies for Fusion Energy with Lasers and Direct-Drive Targets,” IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 38, 2010, 690.                       
    4. J. Blanchard, Q. Hu, and N. Ghoniem, “A Unified Model for Ion Deposition and Thermomechanical Response in Dry Wall Laser IFE Chambers,” Fus Sci Tech, 56, 2009, 341.
    5. A. Aoyama, J. Blanchard, J. Sethian, N. Ghoniem, and S. Sharafat, “Thermo-mechanical Analysis of the Hibachi Foil for the Electra Laser System,” Fus Sci Tech, 56, 2009, 435.
    6. R. Yao and J. Blanchard, “A Micro-Insulation Concept for MEMS Applications,” J Heat Trans, 131, 2009, 052401.
    7. S. Sharafat, G.R. Odette, and J. Blanchard, “Materials and Design Interface,” J Nuc Mat, 386, 2009, 896.
    8. J. Blanchard and R. Raffray, “Laser Fusion Chamber Design,” Fus Sci Tech, 52, 2007, 440.
    9. J. Conzen and J. Blanchard, “An Upper Bound For Stress Waves Induced By Volumetric Heating In IFE Chamber Walls,” Fus Sci Tech, 52, 2007, 506.
    10. A Nosek, J Conzen, H Doescher, C Martin, and J Blanchard, “Thermomechanics of Candidate Coatings for Advanced Gas Reactor Fuels,” J Nuc Mat, 371, 2007, 288.
    11. A. R. Raffray, et al, \"Progress Towards Realization of a Laser IFE Solid Wall Chamber,\" Fus Eng Des, 81, 2006, 1627.
    12. A. R. Raffray, J Blanchard, AE Robson, et al., “Impact of magnetic diversion on laser IFE reactor design and performance,” Journal De Physique IV, 133, 2006, 845.

Courses

Fall 2014-2015

  • NE 489 - Honors in Research
  • NE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • NE 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • NE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • NE 990 - Research and Thesis
  • EMA 599 - Independent Study
  • EMA 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • EMA 690 - Master\'s Research
  • NE 489 - Honors in Research
  • MS&E 423 - Nuclear Engineering Materials
  • NE 423 - Nuclear Engineering Materials
  • NE 602 - Special Topics in Reactor Engineering
  • NE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • NE 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • NE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • NE 990 - Research and Thesis
  • EMA 599 - Independent Study
  • EMA 790 - Master\'s Research and Thesis
  • EMA 890 - Pre-Dissertator Research
  • Profile Summary

    Professor Blanchard\'s research interests include radiation damage in fission and fusion environments, high temperature component design, and nuclear microbatteries.

    If fusion is to be a viable commercial industry, reactor designs must provide adequate component lifetimes. This requires an understanding of various radiation damage mechanisms and their effects on the properties of materials involved. Blanchard conducts theoretical research on the impact of radiation damage to the structural behavior of in-reactor components. He estimates component lifetimes and identifies critical areas where further experimental work is required.

    Blanchard is also interested in the design of high temperature components. This requires analysis of a variety of effects, including thermal stresses, creep, fatigue, and fracture. Blanchard and his students have conducted numerous studies of these phenomena for conceptual fusion devices.

    Blanchard is also interested in the design of nuclear microbatteries. He and his collaboratorrs are using the decay of radioisotopes to create power sources for MEMS devices. We use silicon beams to capture the particles produced by the decay and this results in an electric potential which can be tapped to provide electricity to a MEMS component. One interesting application is the development of a nuclear powered RF transmitter that will allow these devices to communicate with each other wirelessly. Blanchard has also carried out conceptual design of betacells, which are similar to solar cells, but are powered by beta decay. 


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