Barry D. VanVeen

Lynn H. Matthias Professor

3611 Engineering Hall
1415 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706

Ph: (608) 265-2488
Fax: (608) 262-1267
vanveen@engr.wisc.edu

Primary Affiliation:
Electrical and Computer Engineering

Additional Affiliations:
Biomedical Engineering,


Profile Summary

My research interests involve statistical signal processing and its applications. This includes problems in adaptive filtering, adaptive beamforming, signal detection, and estimation, equalization, and sensor array signal processing. My current interests lie in the development of algorithms for biomedical signal processing problems.

My group is developing and analyzing algorithms for reconstructing and modeling electrical activity in the brain from surface measurements of the magnetic and/or electric fields.Problems of interest include localizing sources of activity, reducing noise and interference, and evaluation of connectivity and causal relationships within brain networks.We also develop algorithms for study of the fetal heart and brain from measurements of the magnetic field external to the mother's abdomen. 

Development of algorithms for microwave-based detection, monitoring, and treatment of breast cancer is another major emphasis area.The physical basis for this work is the contrast in dielectric properties between normal and malignant tissue. In detection and monitoring applications, an antenna array transmits low power microwave signals into the breast and measures the corresponding scattered signals. Our algorithms process the scattered signals to localize strong scatterers, estimate and monitor changes in the dielectric properties of breast tissue, and characterize lesions. In treatment applications, we develop algorithms for focusing high power microwave signals to achieve therapeutic heating. 

Education

  • PhD 1986, University of Colorado

Research Interests

  • statistical signal processing algorithm development and analysis
  • signal processing for sensor arrays
  • biomedical applications of signal processing
  • signal processing for study of brain networks from electric and magnetic field measurements
  • signal processing for microwave breast cancer detection, monitoring, and treatment

Awards, Honors and Societies

  • Lynn H. Matthias Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2011
  • IEEE Fellow, 2002, for \"contributions to the development of subspace signal processing algorithms.\"
  • Holdridge Teaching Excellence Award, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Wisconsin, 1997.
  • IEEE Signal Processing Society Paper Award, 1990 for \"Partially Adaptive Beamformer Design via Output Power Minimization,\" IEEE Transactions on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, vol. ASSP-35, pp. 1524-1532, November 1987.
  • National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, 1989.

Links

Courses

Fall 2014-2015

  • ECE 431 - Digital Signal Processing

  • ECE 999 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ECE 990 - Research or Thesis
  • ECE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • ECE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • ECE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • Profile Summary

    My research interests involve statistical signal processing and its applications. This includes problems in adaptive filtering, adaptive beamforming, signal detection, and estimation, equalization, and sensor array signal processing. My current interests lie in the development of algorithms for biomedical signal processing problems.

    My group is developing and analyzing algorithms for reconstructing and modeling electrical activity in the brain from surface measurements of the magnetic and/or electric fields.Problems of interest include localizing sources of activity, reducing noise and interference, and evaluation of connectivity and causal relationships within brain networks.We also develop algorithms for study of the fetal heart and brain from measurements of the magnetic field external to the mother\'s abdomen. 

    Development of algorithms for microwave-based detection, monitoring, and treatment of breast cancer is another major emphasis area.The physical basis for this work is the contrast in dielectric properties between normal and malignant tissue. In detection and monitoring applications, an antenna array transmits low power microwave signals into the breast and measures the corresponding scattered signals. Our algorithms process the scattered signals to localize strong scatterers, estimate and monitor changes in the dielectric properties of breast tissue, and characterize lesions. In treatment applications, we develop algorithms for focusing high power microwave signals to achieve therapeutic heating. 


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