Mikko H. Lipasti

Philip Dunham Reed Professor

Room: 4613
Engineering Hall
1415 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706

Ph: (608) 265-2639
Fax: (608) 262-1267
mikko@engr.wisc.edu


Profile Summary

During the past fourteen years, my research group (the PHARM Team) has engaged in a broad range of research topics related to providing better performance, lower power, and higher reliability for computing systems with one or more processing cores. This work has led to dozens of publications, twelve completed Ph.D. theses, and many more M.S. projects. Our work has been enabled by generous support from industrial partners like Oracle, Qualcomm, Nokia, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, and IBM, as well as federal funding from the National Science Foundation.

Going forward, our main focus areas will be high-performance, low-power, and reliable processor cores; networks-on-chip for many-core processors; and fundamentally new, biologically-inspired models of computation. More information and links to published papers are available from http://pharm.ece.wisc.edu.

 

Education

  • B.S. 1991, Valparaiso University
  • M.S. 1992, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Ph.D. 1997, Carnegie Mellon University

Research Interests

Projects include: reliable and power-efficient processors and systems, reverse-engineering the human neocortex, Electrical and Nanophotonic On-chip Interconnection Networks, Commercial Workload Development and Characterization

  • Reliable and Power-Efficient High-Performance Processors and Systems

    [ HPCA14A, HPCA14B, HPCA14C, ICCD13, ISLPED13, IWLS13, WRA12, DSN12, MICRO11, WRA11, JWAC11, ISCA11, DATE11, MICRO10,SELSE10a, SELSE10b, PACT08, DSN08, ICCD07a, ICCD07b, SELSE07, ISLPED06 ]

    Computer architects face broad new challenges in the twilight years of CMOS: while device density will continue to increase, device reliability, process variability, thermal, power delivery, and energy supply constraints will severely complicate any effort to extract additional performance and functionality from an abundant supply of on-chip transistors. This projects is focused on finding new ways to address these technology-related challenges by rethinking and restructuring conventional circuit, logic, and microarchitectural approaches to better suit the constraints of future CMOS technology.

  • Reverse-engineering the Human Neocortex

    [ HPCA13, IISWC12, JPDC12, SCI12, ICCNS11, ISCA11, IPDPS11, ASPLOS11, ICNC10, ICCNS10, GPGPU10, WNDA09, CIMVPS09 ]

    The amazing computational abilities of the human neocortex are evident to everyone, yet their algorithmic underpinnings are surprisingly poorly understood by the scientific community. The two goals of this project are to (1) improve scientific understanding of cortical structures and algorithms, and (2) build future computing systems that employ similar, cortically-inspired mechanisms. We believe that such systems will be especially well-suited to future nanoscale technologies, since cortical algorithms are inherently tolerant of faults and variations.

  • Electrical and Nanophotonic On-chip Interconnection Networks

    [ MICRO13, NOCS13, WDDD12, MICRO11, HPCA11, MICRO09a, MICRO09b, PICA09, ISCA09, MICRO08, ISCA08, NOCS08, CAL07 ]

    As we move into the era of many-core processor chips, the area, power, and performance overheads of the on-chip interconnect becomes more and more important. We are actively investigating both electrical and optical networks along with co-designed cache coherence protocols for reducing these overheads in chips with sixteen or more cores per die.

  • Commercial Workload Development and Characterization

    [ RACES12, ISPASS11, ICCD08, IISWC07, IOSCA05, CAECW05, CAECW04, CAECW02b, HPCA01 ]

    Relevant and appropriate workloads are arguably the most important input to any research work in computer architecture. Our group continues to characterize, develop, and create new workloads as well as novel architectural approaches that exploit key attributes of such workloads.

Awards, Honors and Societies

Publications

Links

Courses

Summer 2014

  • ECE 999 - Advanced Independent Study

  • ECE 990 - Research or Thesis
  • ECE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • ECE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • ECE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ECE 399 - Independent Study
  • ECE 999 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ECE 990 - Research or Thesis
  • ECE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • ECE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • ECE 699 - Advanced Independent Study
  • ECE 399 - Independent Study
  • Secondary Contact

    Office hours
    W 1-3PM (Spring 2014)

    Profile Summary

    During the past fourteen years, my research group (the PHARM Team) has engaged in a broad range of research topics related to providing better performance, lower power, and higher reliability for computing systems with one or more processing cores. This work has led to dozens of publications, twelve completed Ph.D. theses, and many more M.S. projects. Our work has been enabled by generous support from industrial partners like Oracle, Qualcomm, Nokia, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, and IBM, as well as federal funding from the National Science Foundation.

    Going forward, our main focus areas will be high-performance, low-power, and reliable processor cores; networks-on-chip for many-core processors; and fundamentally new, biologically-inspired models of computation. More information and links to published papers are available from http://pharm.ece.wisc.edu.

     


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