Thomas F. Kuech

Milton J. and A. Maude Shoemaker and Beckwith-Bascom Professor and Chair

4629 Engineering Hall
1415 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706

Ph: (608) 263-2922
Fax: (608) 262-5434
kuech@engr.wisc.edu


Profile Summary

The ongoing development and availability of nanoscale probes, both within the research group and on campus, allow for detailed studies of the development of these next-generation materials and devices. The range of equipment and opportunities described above allow for the development of new research areas and provide an environment for innovation. Our research group is actively involved in designing new in situ monitoring techniques and sensors. Such sensors will be required to control those processes important to the manufacture of semiconductor materials.These sensors will be able to detect, typically through optical techniques, the composition and deposition rate of the growing films. Defects and controlled microstructures are being developed that incorporate new functionality into these materials. We study the formation of semiconductor materials with controlled additions of impurities or dopants that can functionalize the materials for specific device applications. The chemistry, physics and electronic and optical properties of these impurities are studied through spectroscopic and physical techniques. Many of the techniques used in making electronic and optical devices focus on the formation of thin-layer structures through materials deposition on a surface or modification of the near-surface region of the semiconductor. Thin layer structures, where the typical dimension can be much less than 100 nm, can exhibit many unusual and interesting properties attributed to their small physical size. Such structures form the basis of the quantum well laser and other important devices. We study many of these processes, such as the versatile technique of chemical vapor deposition. In this technology, thin semiconductor layers are grown onto a heated substrate through the reaction of gas-phase reactants to form a wide variety of materials. In particular, we study the formation of Si-based materials for the next generation of semiconductor devices and compound semiconductor materials that are important in power and optoelectronic applications. The creation of new materials and their related processes in the modern electronics industry has led to many innovations which impact our daily lives. These processes create electronic and photonic devices through the near-atomic-level control of the composition and electronic structure of materials. Our work centers on developing such new materials, the novel processes required to generate them, and techniques of atomic level characterization.

Education

  • B.S. (Physics), M.S. (Materials Science), Marquette University
  • M.S., Ph.D. (Applied Physics), California Institute of Technology

Research Interests

  • solid-state materials synthesis and characterization
  • electronic and semiconductor materials
  • solar energy and photovoltaics
  • oxide materials
  • nanostructure formation

Awards, Honors and Societies

  • Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2012
  • UW-Foundation Chair Beckwith-Bascom Professorship, 2011-
  • Alexander von Humboldt Senior Research Award, 2011
  • National Academy of Engineering, 2010-
  • Fellow of the IEEE, 2010
  • Boelter University Lecturer, University of California, Los Angeles, 2010
  • Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, 2011-
  • Honorary Professor, Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing China, 2010.
  • Crystal Growth Award, American Association for Crystal Growth, 2009.
  • Pigford Lecturer, Delaware University, Chemical Engineering Department, 2005.
  • Charles M.A. Stine Award of the American Institute for Chemical Engineers, 2003.
  • Concurrent Professorship, Dept. of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China, 2000
  • Byron Bird Award for a Research Publication, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2000.
  • Fellow of the American Physical Society, 1997.
  • Vaughan Lecturer, California Institute of Technology, May, 1996.
  • Romnes Faculty Fellowship, awarded by University of Wisconsin, 1992.   
  • Böhmische Physical Society, 1988
  • Young Authors Award, American Association for Crystal Growth, 1987.
  • IBM Outstanding Innovation Achievement Award, 1986 for Identification of Doping Mechanisms in MOVPE   
  • IBM Outstanding Innovation Achievement Award, 1989 for Discovery of Long Range Order in Alloy Semiconductors
  • California Institute of Technology Fellowship, 1977-1981
  • ARCS Foundation Fellowship, 1979-1980
  • Academic Honors, Marquette University, 1972-1976
  • Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi

Publications

  • “Carrier dynamics and defects in MOVPE-grown bulk InGaAs layers with metamorphic InGaAs and InGaPSb buffer layers for solar cells”, Yongkun Sin, S.D.  LaLumondiere, B.J. Foran, W.T. Lotshaw, S.C. Moss, Tae Wan Kim, P. Dudley, PJ.  Kirch, S. Ruder, L.J. Mawst, and T.F.Kuech, Proceedings of the SPIE  v 8255 (2012) 825516 .
  • “Narrow band gap (1 eV) InGaAsSbN solar cells grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy”, T.W. Kim, T.J. Garrod, K. Kim, J.J. Lee, S.D. LaLumondiere, Y. Sin, W.T. Lotshaw, S.C. Moss, T.F.  Kuech, R. Tatavarti, L.J. Mawst, Appl. Phys. Lett. 100 (2012) 121120.
  • “Chemical characterization of DNA-immobilized InAs surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure”, Eunkyung Cho, April Brown, and Thomas F. Kuech, Langmuir, v 28(2012) 11890-11898.
  •  “Diffuse reflectance spectral imaging for breast tumor margin assessment”, J.Y. Lo, S. Dhar, B. Yu, M.A. Brooke, T.F. Kuech, N.M. Jokerst, N.Ramanujam, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE, v 8214, 2012.
  • “The effect of helium ion implantation on the relaxation of strained InGaAs thin films”,C.A. Paulson, S. Jha, X. Song, M. Rathi, S.E. Babcock, L. Mawst, T.F. Kuech, Thin Solid Films, 520 (2012) 2147-2154.
  • “Atomic Layer Deposition of Titanium Phosphate on Silica Nanoparticles”, Monika K. Wiedmann, David H. K. Jackson, Yomaira J. Pagan-Torres, Eunkyung Cho, James A. Dumesic, and T. F. Kuech, J. Vacuum Sci. and Technology, 30 (2012) 01A134 (8 pp.).
  • \"Hemin-Functionalized InAs-based High Sensitivity Room Temperature NO Gas Sensors\", Aruna Dedigama, Michael Angelo, Pete Torrione, Tong Kim, Scott; Wolter, William Lampert, Ayomide Atewologun, Madhavie Edirisooriya, Leslie Collins, Thomas F. Kuech, Maria Losurdo, Giovanni Bruno, April Brown, J. of Physical Chemistry, 116 (2012) 826-833.
  • “Controlled formation of GaAs pn junctions during hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaAs”, Kevin L. Schulte, William L. Rance, Robert C. Reedy, Aaron J. Ptak, David L. Young, and Thomas F. Kuech, Journal of Crystal Growth, 352 (2012) 253-7.
  • “Characteristics of bulk InGaAsN and InGaAsSbN materials grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) for solar cell application”, T.W. Kim, T.J. Garrod, K. Kim, J. Lee, L.J. Mawst, T.F. Kuech, S.D. LaLumondiere, Y.  Sin, W.T. Lotshaw, and S.C. Moss, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, v 8256, 2012.
  • “Characterization of immobilized DNA on sulfur-passivated InAs surfaces”, EunKyung Cho, Pae Wu, M.  Ahmed, A. Brown, and T.F. Kuech, Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, v 1301, p 259-265, 2011.
  • “A custom wide-field spectral imager for breast cancer margin assessment”,  S. Dhar, J.Y. Lob, B. Yu, T.Tyler, M.A. Brooke, N. Ramanujam, N.M. Jokerst,  and T.F. Kuech, 2011 IEEE Photonics Conference (IPC 2011), (2011)  798-9.

Links

Courses

Summer 2014

  • CBE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CBE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • CBE 990 - Thesis-Research
  • MS&E 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • CBE 489 - Honors in Research
  • CBE 790 - Master\'s Research or Thesis
  • CBE 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • CBE 990 - Thesis-Research
  • MS&E 890 - Pre-Dissertator\'s Research
  • Profile Summary

    The ongoing development and availability of nanoscale probes, both within the research group and on campus, allow for detailed studies of the development of these next-generation materials and devices. The range of equipment and opportunities described above allow for the development of new research areas and provide an environment for innovation. Our research group is actively involved in designing new in situ monitoring techniques and sensors. Such sensors will be required to control those processes important to the manufacture of semiconductor materials.These sensors will be able to detect, typically through optical techniques, the composition and deposition rate of the growing films. Defects and controlled microstructures are being developed that incorporate new functionality into these materials. We study the formation of semiconductor materials with controlled additions of impurities or dopants that can functionalize the materials for specific device applications. The chemistry, physics and electronic and optical properties of these impurities are studied through spectroscopic and physical techniques. Many of the techniques used in making electronic and optical devices focus on the formation of thin-layer structures through materials deposition on a surface or modification of the near-surface region of the semiconductor. Thin layer structures, where the typical dimension can be much less than 100 nm, can exhibit many unusual and interesting properties attributed to their small physical size. Such structures form the basis of the quantum well laser and other important devices. We study many of these processes, such as the versatile technique of chemical vapor deposition. In this technology, thin semiconductor layers are grown onto a heated substrate through the reaction of gas-phase reactants to form a wide variety of materials. In particular, we study the formation of Si-based materials for the next generation of semiconductor devices and compound semiconductor materials that are important in power and optoelectronic applications. The creation of new materials and their related processes in the modern electronics industry has led to many innovations which impact our daily lives. These processes create electronic and photonic devices through the near-atomic-level control of the composition and electronic structure of materials. Our work centers on developing such new materials, the novel processes required to generate them, and techniques of atomic level characterization.


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