Michael D. Graham

Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor and Harvey D. Spangler Professor

3010 Engineering Hall
1415 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706

Ph: (608) 265-3780
Fax: (608) 262-5434
graham@engr.wisc.edu


Profile Summary

The Graham group studies the dynamics of flowing complex and multiphase fluids - materials whose microstructure interacts in a nontrivial way with how it is deformed by flow. These fluids - suspensions, emulsions, gels, molten plastics, solutions of macromolecules and many others - arise in a tremendous variety of natural and technological settings, and an important and intriguing aspect of the dynamics of these fluids is their intrinsically multiscale nature - the bottom-up and top-down coupling all the way from the scales of the whole process down to the scale of individual particles or molecules. Specific current interests are motivated by applications in microfluidics, nanotechnology, biology and energy conservation, and include manipulation of genomic DNA in micro- and nanofluidic devices, flow of suspensions of cells or vesicles, the swimming of populations of microorganisms and the dynamics of complex fluids in turbulent flows.

Editorial service

Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

  • Editor-in-Chief, 2013-
  • Editorial Board Member, 2004-2012

Physical Review E

  • Editorial Board Member, 2013-2015

Journal of Fluid Mechanics

  • Associate Editor, 2005-2012

 

Education

  • Ph.D., Cornell University
  • B.S., University of Dayton

Research Interests

  • Applied and computational mathematics
  • Microstructural and multiscale simulations of complex fluids
  • applications to microfluidics, nanotechnology and biology
  • Viscoelastic and Newtonian fluid mechanics, especially stability and nonlinear dynamics

Awards, Honors and Societies

  • Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professorship, UW-Madison, 2014
  • Stewartson Lecture, British Applied Mathematics Colloquium, 2014
  • Plenary lecture, American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics Annual Meeting, 2013
  • Probstein Lecture, MIT, 2013
  • Plenary lecture, European Rheology Conference, 2013
  • Plenary lecture, Society of Rheology Annual Meeting, 2013
  • Pearson Lectures, UC-Santa Barbara, 2012
  • Kellett Mid-Career Award, UW-Madison, 2012
  • Fellow, American Physical Society, 2011
  • Harvey D. Spangler Professorship, Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering, UW-Madison, 2005
  • Allan P. Colburn Memorial Lecture, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of Delaware, 2005
  • Francois Naftali Frenkiel Award for Fluid Mechanics, American Physical Society, 2004
  • Vilas Associate in the Physical Sciences, 2002-2004
  • 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award, 1997
  • NSF CAREER Award, 1995
  • Shell Faculty Fellowship, 1994
  • DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) fellowship, 1990

Links

Textbook: Modeling and Analysis...

Graham and Rawlings: Modeling and Analysis Principles for Chemical and Biological Engineers

 

Research undertaken by modern chemical and biological engineers incorporates a wide range of mathematical principles and methods. This book came about as the authors struggled to incorporate modern topics into a one- or two-semester course sequence for new graduate students, while not losing the essential aspects of traditional mathematical modeling syllabi. Topics that we decided are particularly important but not represented in traditional texts include: matrix factorizations such as the singular value decomposition, basic qualitative dynamics of nonlinear differential equations, integral representations of partial differential equations, probability and stochastic processes, and state estimation. The reader will find many more in the book. These topics are generally absent in many texts, which often have a bias toward the mathematics of 19th- through early 20th-century physics. We also believe that the book will be of substantial interest to active researchers, as it is in many respects a survey of the applied mathematics commonly encountered by chemical and biological engineering practitioners, and contains many topics that were almost certainly absent in their chemical engineering graduate coursework.

Profile Summary

The Graham group studies the dynamics of flowing complex and multiphase fluids - materials whose microstructure interacts in a nontrivial way with how it is deformed by flow. These fluids - suspensions, emulsions, gels, molten plastics, solutions of macromolecules and many others - arise in a tremendous variety of natural and technological settings, and an important and intriguing aspect of the dynamics of these fluids is their intrinsically multiscale nature - the bottom-up and top-down coupling all the way from the scales of the whole process down to the scale of individual particles or molecules. Specific current interests are motivated by applications in microfluidics, nanotechnology, biology and energy conservation, and include manipulation of genomic DNA in micro- and nanofluidic devices, flow of suspensions of cells or vesicles, the swimming of populations of microorganisms and the dynamics of complex fluids in turbulent flows.


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